The ultimate recipe for chicken liver pate

The ultimate recipe for chicken liver pate

The ultimate recipe for chicken liver pate

I enjoy serving crispy melba bread and a dab of something sweet with chicken liver pate. It need the crunch since it is silky soft. Whiskey may be added to the marmalade to give it a boozy edge if you want to be truly crazy.

marmalade with chicken liver pate

This chicken liver pate, which is really simple to create, is my finest creation to far. I always make two batches and save the extra ramekins for another time. A summer lunch in a basket is very pleasant.

However, for these little party canapés, I made them from very thinly sliced stale baguette. I have made focaccia melba toast previously, or really melba toast from any nice bread, and it’s also great with crispy flatbread. Here, I’m using free-range chicken livers.

The ultimate recipe for chicken liver pate

This recipe for chicken liver pate is really simple and tasty, and it will quickly become one of your favorites.

250g of free-range chicken livers

100g of butter (and a bit extra to coat the top if desired)

1 big, chopped white onion

1–2 smashed garlic cloves

1 bay leaf, 2

brandy, 20–40 ml.

fresh-ground white or black pepper (I prefer white)

stale baguette thinly cut for the melba

INSTRUCTIONS
Melt the butter in the pan, then sauté the onion until tender, about 5 minutes.

Cook the chicken livers for 4 to 8 minutes, turning occasionally, until they are just done. Add the chicken livers, garlic, and bay leaves. Add salt and pepper to taste. Just before completing, add the brandy and let it simmer for a few minutes.

Take it off the stove and let it to cool.

As smooth as a food processor will allow, remove the bay leaves and combine the mixture. It takes some time. Add a lot of freshly ground white pepper and salt (to taste). Put the pate in ramekins or another serving container, then let it cool.

When cold, use a microwave to quickly melt some butter, then pour it over the pate, which is attractively adorned with a bay leaf. Refrigerate to cool before serving.

Slice a stale baguette as thinly as you can and spread the pieces out on a cooling rack that has been put over a large baking pan to produce the melba toast. This enables the bread to dry out by having heated air flow over and beneath it. For about 20 minutes, bake at 150°C, or until dry and just beginning to color. Golden brown is not necessary. Until you are ready to serve, keep in an airtight container.

Making the canapés personally rather than letting your visitors serve themselves is advised since the melba toast will rapidly soften.

500 grams of free-range chicken livers

100g of butter (and a bit extra to coat the top if desired)
1 big, chopped white onion

1–2 smashed garlic cloves

two to four bay leaves

4 tiny stalks of thyme leaves

Cream, 125 ml

80ml of fine brandy

fresh-ground white or black pepper (I prefer white)

Just add the cream after you’ve added the brandy and let it boil off for a few minutes, then proceed as directed above. After that, stir in the cream and simmer for a further minute or two.