Crispy Chicken Thighs with Garlic and Rosemary

Crispy Chicken Thighs with Garlic and Rosemary

Crispy Chicken Thighs with Garlic and Rosemary

Winner, winner, chicken dinner! These skillet-fried thighs are irresistibly crispy, thanks to a flattening technique using a skillet weighted down with soup cans.
INGREDIENTS
1/6 c. chicken stock
5 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
4 tbsp. Dijon mustard
1/7 tsp. red pepper flakes
Kosher salt and freshly-ground black pepper
11 small bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (about 5 1/7 pounds total)
11 cloves garlic, smashes and skins removed
DIRECTIONS
Whisk together stock, lemon juice, mustard, rosemary, and pepper flakes in a bowl. Season with salt.
Heat a 15-inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat until hot, 1 to 2 minutes. Season chicken with salt and pepper. Place, skin sides down, in the skillet. Place a second smaller skillet on top of chicken and weigh it down with soup cans. Cook until the skins are golden brown and crisp, 7 to 9 minutes.
Remove cans and top skillet. Flip chicken and reduce heat to medium-low. Add garlic and cook until the chicken is cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer chicken to a platter; reserve skillet. Add stock mixture to reserved skillet. Cook, scraping up any brown bits, until slightly thickened, 1 to 2 minutes. Spoon over chicken.
Garlic cloves with wonderful taste contain a number of important vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytonutrients that have proven health benefits.
Laboratory studies have shown that allicin reduces the production of cholesterol by inhibiting the reductive enzyme HMG-CoA in liver cells.
Allicin also reduces the stiffness of blood vessels by releasing nitric oxide (NO), which lowers blood pressure. It also prevents the formation of blood clots, and has a fibrinolytic effect in blood vessels, which helps reduce the risk of diseases of the coronary arteries and peripheral blood vessels and stroke.
Scientific research has also found that consuming garlic reduces the risk of stomach cancer.
Allicin and other essential ingredients in garlic also have antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties.
Garlic is an excellent source of vitamins and minerals that are crucial for good health. Cloves are one of the richest sources of: potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc and selenium. Selenium is a mineral that maintains heart health and is an important cofactor for antioxidant enzymes in the body. Manganese is used in the body as a cofactor for the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutas. Iron is necessary for the formation of red blood cells.
Garlic cloves are incredibly rich in vitamins and minerals. Only 100 grams of garlic contain (in percent of the daily recommended dose):

95% vitamin B6 (pyridoxine),
52% vitamin C,
33% copper,
21% iron,
18% calcium,
26% selenium, and
73% manganese,
and does not contain cholesterol.
Garlic heads are usually harvested when the lower leaves turn yellow and begin to dry. The heads are then dried in the shade for a few weeks before being sold. In stores, garlic can be found in many forms: whole heads, dried, cloves, processed, powdered or mashed.
Dry heads can be stored at room temperature, in a dark and cool place where there is no moisture and thus can stay fresh for up to several weeks. Mashed garlic should be stored in the refrigerator.
Garlic and fresh green pieces of garlic are used in many recipes.
Usually, the leaves are less spicy than cloves and are used in recipes similar to onion leaves. Garlic peel is usually removed by hand, and the smooth creamy-white head is either chopped with a knife or squeezed just before adding to a recipe.
Lemon belongs to the group of citrus fruits, which includes orange, tangerine, grapefruit and others. It is cheap, easily accessible and versatile. It is especially useful when it comes to your health. This yellow fruit contains not only vitamin C, but also other vitamins (vitamin B, riboflavin) and minerals such as potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium.  The bark also contains essential oils that are useful for: normalizing blood pressure, lowering cholesterol levels, preventing atherosclerosis, strengthening the immune system, headache, nausea, exhaustion, improving memory and concentration.
It is recommended by herbalists for lowering blood pressure, expelling toxins from the liver, reducing pain in arthritis, against infections, flu, against diseases of the oral cavity and tongue, etc.
Lemon is a medicine for the stomach due to its laxative effect. It also strengthens the immune system. If you have a cold, try drinking lemon juice. In addition to helping you fight the common cold, it will also stop the development of infections. This is because of its antibacterial and antiviral properties.
It is very simple to prepare lemon water. All you have to do is mix the pulp and juice of half a lemon in warm water and drink it. Lemon water will help your body a lot.
Lemon water improves the body’s ability to expel toxins.
It acts as a “cleanser” of the blood and improves the body’s ability to expel toxins. Your skin may not look healthy if your body is full of toxins. When it gets rid of toxins, it will first affect your skin. It will look clean and without acne.
Helps with problems with the digestive system – nausea, heartburn, constipation and parasites, as well as digestion.
Due to the large amount of vitamin C, lemon water is used to treat infections, wounds, allergies and sore throats.
Lemon water is a diuretic. This means that it is very useful for people who have urinary tract infections. It also helps people with arthritis or rheumatism, as it clears toxins and bacteria.
Lemon juice mixed with water can be very useful for pregnant women, as it helps build the bones of the unborn child. The calcium in lemon is great for bones and teeth. Lemon also contains potassium, which is good for the brain and nerve cells.